Video Art

I was first introduced to video art and avant-garde filmmaking my sophomore year of college at Binghamton University. I was required to take Cinema 122 which was a class taught by Martin Arnold giving a history of video art and avant-garde filmmaking. I was shown pieces by Peter Kubelka, Michael Snow, Gary Hill, Tony Oursler, Bruce Conner, Stan Brakhage, William Kentridge, and a number of other great experimental filmmakers. Apprehensive as first I wasn’t really sure I could become part of this film work but once I picked up the camera for the first time I realized that this was the type of work I was made for. It resonated with me in it’s ethical beliefs about art and commerce and provided a nice outlet for my ADDified mind.

Video Art Filmography:

  • I Love Nicholson (January 2006, about 1 minutes 30 seconds, MiniDv) – Using footage shot on a tv screen of Jack Nicholson and random I Love Lucy footage I created a very short experimental music video.
  • Playground (February 2006, about 2 minutes, MiniDv) – Editing experiment using footage shot at a park I used to play at when I was growing up in Binghamton, NY.
  • Graveyard (March 2006, Super 8mm) – My first roll of black and white super 8 mm film shooting single frames in a graveyard in Johnson City, NY.
  • Super 8mm Experiment (March 2006, Super 8mm) – A structuralist film created with material filmed off a small television. Unfortunately, this film was lost during a telecine transfer session somewhere in the basement of a Binghamton University lecture hall building.
  • Boston (April 2006, 3 minutes and 0 seconds, Super 8mm) – A one reel condensed version of a family trip to Boston.
  • Structural Fashion (November 2006, about 1 minute and 30 seconds, 16mm) – A structural film using material shot in downtown Binghamton, NY.
  • Constellations (September 2007, about 3 minutes and 0 seconds, MiniDV) – An abstract film creating star imagery with other materials.
  • Untitled Four Screen Installation (November 2007, about 6 minutes and 0 seconds, MiniDV and Super 8mm films) – Transferred and then edited commercial super 8mm films shown on three television and one projector interacting with each other. This installation was displayed at Jungle Science Gallery in Binghamton, NY.
  • S and M (December 2007, about 4 minutes and 15 seconds, MiniDV) – Two television screens with images of rural upstate NY areas allowing the viewer to compare and contrast between true moving and still images.
  • Flash Match (April 2008, about 5 minutes and 10 seconds, MiniDV) – A video board game installation project which consists of the viewers throwing cards at the screen when prompted and obeying a voice narrating the game.
  • Constellation Installation (May 2008, Duration is as long as the project is displayed, MiniDV, DVD player, Projector, Green Turf, Picnic Basket, Sleeping Bags) – Installation recreating the atmosphere of sitting outside looking at the stars. This installation was displayed at Spool Mfg. in Johnson City, NY.
  • Modern Hand Processing (September 2008, 3 minutes and 18 seconds, MiniDV and old horror movie clips) – An attempt to create the same type of unpredictable material that hand processed film can harness but typical digital video can not.
  • Dance Piece 1 (September 2008, 2 minutes and 29 seconds, MiniDV) – A film attempting to choreograph numerous dance sequences at one given time. Screened at University At Buffalo Academic Excellence Gala 2009.
  • French Dance ( October 2008, 3 minutes and 2 seconds, MiniDV and Vinyl Records) – Creating a dance piece with assorted dance material I had filmed. The piece matches a soundtrack I created with augments and partially destroyed “learn to speak french” vinyl records. Screen at University At Buffalo Academic Excellence Gala 2009.
  • Abstract Dance (November 2008, 2 minutes and 16 seconds, MiniDV) – The title says it all. An abstract piece derived from material shot of a dance class. Screened at University At Buffalo Academic Excellence Gala 2009.

Abstract Dance (November 2008, silent with visual)